Anglesey awkwardness

This is a fox moth which is what the caterpillar we saw would have turned into.

This is a fox moth which is what the caterpillar we saw would have turned into.

This is the caterpillar of the fox moth that I took a picture of.

This is the caterpillar of the fox moth that I took a picture of.

stonechat

guillemotslinnet

In April, we went to Anglesey in Wales.  My brother Redwin was constantly in a very awkward mood, goodness knows why.  We went to two reserves: Newborough Warren and South Stack.

On the first day, we went to Newborough in the evening.  The place was said to be a haven for red squirrels, because there are no greys to compete with, but unfortunately, we didn’t see any.  Despite this, it was a very nice nice walk and we heard lots of willow warblers and chiffchaffs and we found a woodpecker drumming post.

On the second day, we went to South Stack near Holly Head.  We saw a lot of meadow pipits, a couple of linnets and some stonechats.  We found a big woolly caterpillar, which later on we found out to belong to a fox moth.  We saw some choughs, which are related to jackdaws.  South Stack is one of their last refuges in the UK.  They have vivid red legs and a beak which is curved.  We saw some kestrels chasing each other round near the cliffs.  We saw some razorbills and guillemots swimming on the sea, and they were my first razorbills.  We went up to the observatory, where you could see all the sea birds nesting on the cliffs: we saw guillemots, razorbills and fulmars all crammed on to ledges.  Guillemot eggs are a special shape so they don’t roll of the ledges where the adult birds lay them.  We walked up to near the lighthouse and we saw a pair of puffins running about with materials. These were my first puffins. Puffins nest in abandoned rabbit burrows.

 

puffin